Welcome to our Ophthalmology practice in North Texas specializing in macular diseases, diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachments, and more.

Hours of operation

Monday: 8-5pm

Tuesday: 8-5pm

Wednesday: 8-5pm

Thursday: 8-5pm

Friday: 8-12pm

Saturday: closed

Sunday: closed

Dr. Elshatory Performing Slit Lamp Biomicroscopy

Dr. Elshatory Performing Slit Lamp Biomicroscopy

Photo of Dr. Yasser Elshatory, MD, PhD, FACS

ERA Blog

Specializing in the evaluation and treatment of conditions affecting the vitreous, macula, and retina

Click the links below to learn more about these conditions that Dr. Elshatory routinely evaluates and treats:

A choroidal hyperpermeability condition exacerbated by endogenous and exogenous glucocorticoid exposure.

Retained lens material, dislocated intraocular lenses, retinal detachment, infections (endophthalmitis), and macular edema can occur with varying frequency.

A small vessel disease. Microvascular damage leads to leakage of fluid and cholesterol (macular edema). Severe drop-out of microvasculature decreases blood flow (ischemia), which may lead to new vessel growth (neovascularization) that bleeds (vitreous hemorrhage) and/or scars (fibrosis). Retinal detachments can result from this fibrotic tissue.

A severe intraocular infection that can be post-operative, post-traumatic, or arise from an endogenous source (such as bacteria in the blood known as bacteremia). Usually bacterial, endophthalmitis can also be fungal.

The Herpesviridae class of viruses that includes herpesvirus 1 & 2, varicella zoster virus, and cytomegalovirus, may lead to severe infection of the retina that requires treatment with antivirals. Immune status is important, as only those with a compromised immune system tend to get infectious retinitis with some of the viruses in this class, such as cytomegalovirus.

A peripheral retinal finding that is associated with increased incidence of retinal tears and detachments. It is not degenerative in nature, as the name would suggest.

An age-related condition where the interplay of excess "waste" deposition and/or decreased "waste" clearance gives rise to drusen (yellow deposits under the retina). Drusen may lead to choroidal neovascularization (wet macular degeneration) and/or atrophy (advanced dry macular degeneration) in a process thought to involve the body's innate immunity (complement cascade, inflammasome activity).

A tenacious vitreoretinal attachment at the fovea underlies this condition. With age-related vitreous changes, focal disruption of the retina may occur. Vitrectomy surgery is effective at restoring much of the vision lost from a macular hole.

Tenacious vitreoretinal attachments in the peripheral retina often underlie this condition. With age-related vitreous changes, focal disruption of the retina may occur, leading to a retinal tear. Vitreous hemorrhage may result from broken retinal vessels that are intrinsic to the retina. Left untreated (without laser barricade treatment), a retinal tear can lead to a retinal detachment.

A tenacious vitreoretinal attachment at the fovea underlies this condition. With age-related vitreous changes, focal disruption of the retina may occur. This condition may evolve into a macular hole. Treatment may involve pneumatic vitreolysis, vitrectomy, or pharmacological vitreolysis.

A retinal vessel hyperpermeability condition that can result from retinal vessel disease (diabetes, vein occlusion), inflammation in the eye (uveitis, after cataract surgery), or from certain systemic medications (such as niacin, fingolomid).

A typically translucent membrane stretching across the macular surface can develop distorting the contour of the retina. The distorted retinal contour can distort vision (metamorphopsia). Vitrectomy surgery aimed at removing this membrane often relieves the distortion in vision.

Age-appropriate vitreous degeneration occurs, often leading to vitreous separation from the retina (a posterior vitreous detachment). There is heightened risk of retinal tears and retinal detachment following this vitreous separation.

Typically an embolus from the heart or carotid arteries can dislodge and occlude the central retinal artery leading to a largely irreversible, devastating vision loss in one eye. Rarely, this can be the result of an inflammatory vascular disease (giant cell arteritis).

A tear in the retina often occurring following a posterior vitreous detachment can allow fluid to detach the retina from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium (rhegmatogenous retinal detachment). Surface traction may lead to a detachment as well (tractional retinal detachment). Retinal reattachment surgery is often curative.

A local thrombosis in a retinal vein can lead to swelling of the macula or retinal neovascularization requiring treatment with injections and/or laser to manage the sequelae of this condition.

An inherited genetic condition leading to degeneration of photoreceptor cells often affecting peripheral and night vision.

An inflammatory sometimes infectious condition affecting the eye that can lead to vision loss, and may require local or systemic medications to treat.

Common Questions Regarding Retinal Detachments


What causes a retinal detachment?

Most detachments of the retina occur following a vitreous detachment. When the vitreous detaches from the retina, it can tug on the retina and cause a tear. This tear allows liquid vitreous to sneak underneath the retina, detaching it.

Do retinal detachments require surgery to fix?

Not always. If the detachment is very localized and has not progressed to involve a lot of the retina, laser can be placed in the office to surround the detachment and lessen the chance of progression. If the detachment has progressed, we would need to discuss several other treatment options, some of which require surgery in an operating room.

Can I fly after a retinal detachment?

If you had a detachment where a gas bubble was injected in the eye to steam roll the retina flat, then flying is usually prohibited. The high altitude causes the gas in the eye to expand, and this can block of the eye's circulation leading to blindness.


Common questions regarding macular degeneration?




Is macular degeneration genetic?

The biggest risk factor is not genetics but age. I consider this condition a complex condition, with multiple things that can make you more or less likely to have it. One's ancestry can predispose to it, but your ancestry does not guarentee you will have it.

If you had a detachment where a gas bubble was injected in the eye to steam roll the retina flat, then flying is usually prohibited. The high altitude causes the gas in the eye to expand, and this can block of the eye's circulation leading to blindness.

If I need injections for wet macular degeneration, will I need the treatment lifelong?

Most retina doctors prefer to continue treatments long-term, but to a lesser extent. The goal of this is to lessen the chance of a recurrence of bleeding or leakage from wet macular degeneration. There are certainly people that can get away with getting less injections, and others that need more frequent injections. This variability makes stopping treatment difficult, but worth discussing with your retina specialist.

What can I do to lessen the chance of my losing vision from macular degeneration?

  1. Avoid smoking, as this increases the risk of getting macular degeneration complications.

  2. Check your central vision (with an Amsler grid) in each separately to look for new distortion or mini blindspots.

  3. Have your eyes dilated at least once every two years once you have reached the age of 50.

  4. Eat a balanced diet enriched with green, leafy vegetables. These vegetables have lutein an zeaxanthin, which have been shown to be beneficial in patients with macular degeneration.

My father and mother both have macular degeneration, should I take lutein and zeaxanthin, or AREDS vitamins?

AREDS vitamins have not shown benefit in people with a family history of macular degeneration alone. In fact, the vitamins have not shown benefit in people with early or advanced macular degeneration, but only intermediate macular degeneration sufferers benefited from supplementation. Therefore, one needs an eye exam to determine, 1) if they have macular degeneration, and 2) if they have the intermediate stage prior to starting AREDS vitamins.